National Equity Atlas Update

New Analysis Finds People of Color and Immigrants are Disproportionately Harmed by Labor-Market Impacts of COVID-19

Dear Atlas Users,

The brutal murder of George Floyd by the Minneapolis police was a stark reminder of the racism that permeates our institutions, threatens Black life, and diminishes us as a nation. We cannot achieve inclusive prosperity without addressing police brutality, and the Atlas team stands in solidarity with those protesting this unjust system and calling for transformative change. We are working hard to finalize the new Atlas system upgrade to share with you later this month, and have been partnering with other data providers to assess the unequal economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic by race, gender, nativity, and occupation. Here are a few highlights:

New Analysis: Disaggregated Data on Economic Impacts of COVID-19 for US and 10 Metros

Today, in partnership with Burning Glass Technologies and JPMorgan Chase, we released the most comprehensive analysis to date of the labor market effects of the coronavirus pandemic, aiming to inform equity-focused relief and recovery strategies. In addition to the US, we analyzed 10 metro regions: Boston, Chicago, Columbus, Dallas, Detroit, Los Angeles, Miami, Nashville, San Francisco, and Seattle. Our analysis reveals that people of color and immigrants are concentrated in occupations that have experienced the steepest declines in job opportunities and will likely be among the last to recover, putting Black, Latinx, and Native American workers at heightened risk of long-term unemployment. People of color are also overrepresented in low-wage essential jobs, and Native Americans and immigrants are most concentrated in essential jobs where opportunities are declining. Among the 10 regions, the economic impacts of the virus are uneven: metros with large tourism sectors (like Nashville and Miami) have been hit particularly hard, while diversified regional economies with strong tech sectors (like Seattle and SF) have fared somewhat better. Read the full analysis here.

New Profile of Bay Area Essential Workers

In May, the Bay Area Equity Atlas released three new analyses focused on frontline workers in the region, including two deep dives into workforce demographics in Sonoma and Santa Clara counties. We found that frontline workers in these counties and the Bay overall are disproportionately Latinx, Black, and women of color, which could help explain why these populations are more likely to contract COVID-19. Latinx workers represent 22 percent of workers in all industries but 31 percent of frontline workers while Black workers, who account for just 5 percent of all workers in the region, are concentrated in specific frontline industries including public transit (23 percent) and postal services (11 percent). These workers are more likely to live in poverty, lack health insurance, and have no internet access at home. Read our analyses here. Check out media coverage of this research from KQEDSF Gate, and La Opinion.

National Equity Atlas In the News

  • Ron Brownstein at The Atlantic analyzed National Equity Atlas data and corresponded with Atlas team members to inform his new article about how racial inequity is “the crack in the foundation of cities’ new prosperity.” Looking at data on median wages for New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Houston, Dallas, Atlanta, Miami, Seattle, Denver, Philadelphia, and Minneapolis, he found that racial wage gaps have grown in all of those cities between 1980 and 2015.
     
  • E&E News published an article describing the criticism and subsequent revision of CDC guidelines encouraging workers to commute alone in private vehicles to slow the spread of the coronavirus, lifting up Atlas data showing that nearly 20 percent of Black households and 12 percent of Latinx households do not have access to a car, compared to 6.5 percent of White households. "So yes, there is a race and class bias in saying, 'You can just drive to work,'" said Basav Sen, climate justice project director at the Institute for Policy Studies.
     

Thank you for your interest in our work.

-- The National Equity Atlas team at PolicyLink and the USC Program for Environmental and Regional Equity (PERE)

National Equity Atlas Update

Dear Atlas Users,

The brutal murder of George Floyd by the Minneapolis police was a stark reminder of the racism that permeates our institutions, threatens Black life, and diminishes us as a nation. We cannot achieve inclusive prosperity without addressing police brutality, and the Atlas team stands in solidarity with those protesting this unjust system and calling for transformative change. We are working hard to finalize the new Atlas system upgrade to share with you later this month, and have been partnering with other data providers to assess the unequal economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic by race, gender, nativity, and occupation. Here are a few highlights:

New Analysis: Disaggregated Data on Economic Impacts of COVID-19 for US and 10 Metros

Today, in partnership with Burning Glass Technologies and JPMorgan Chase, we released the most comprehensive analysis to date of the labor market effects of the coronavirus pandemic, aiming to inform equity-focused relief and recovery strategies. In addition to the US, we analyzed 10 metro regions: Boston, Chicago, Columbus, Dallas, Detroit, Los Angeles, Miami, Nashville, San Francisco, and Seattle. Our analysis reveals that people of color and immigrants are concentrated in occupations that have experienced the steepest declines in job opportunities and will likely be among the last to recover, putting Black, Latinx, and Native American workers at heightened risk of long-term unemployment. People of color are also overrepresented in low-wage essential jobs, and Native Americans and immigrants are most concentrated in essential jobs where opportunities are declining. Among the 10 regions, the economic impacts of the virus are uneven: metros with large tourism sectors (like Nashville and Miami) have been hit particularly hard, while diversified regional economies with strong tech sectors (like Seattle and SF) have fared somewhat better. Read the full analysis here.
 

New Profile of Bay Area Essential Workers

In May, the Bay Area Equity Atlas released three new analyses focused on frontline workers in the region, including two deep dives into workforce demographics in Sonoma and Santa Clara counties. We found that frontline workers in these counties and the Bay overall are disproportionately Latinx, Black, and women of color, which could help explain why these populations are more likely to contract COVID-19. Latinx workers represent 22 percent of workers in all industries but 31 percent of frontline workers while Black workers, who account for just 5 percent of all workers in the region, are concentrated in specific frontline industries including public transit (23 percent) and postal services (11 percent). These workers are more likely to live in poverty, lack health insurance, and have no internet access at home. Read our analyses here. Check out media coverage of this research from KQEDSF Gate, and La Opinion.
 

National Equity Atlas In the News

  • Ron Brownstein at The Atlantic analyzed National Equity Atlas data and corresponded with Atlas team members to inform his new article about how racial inequity is “the crack in the foundation of cities’ new prosperity.” Looking at data on median wages for New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Houston, Dallas, Atlanta, Miami, Seattle, Denver, Philadelphia, and Minneapolis, he found that racial wage gaps have grown in all of those cities between 1980 and 2015.
     
  • E&E News published an article describing the criticism and subsequent revision of CDC guidelines encouraging workers to commute alone in private vehicles to slow the spread of the coronavirus, lifting up Atlas data showing that nearly 20 percent of Black households and 12 percent of Latinx households do not have access to a car, compared to 6.5 percent of White households. "So yes, there is a race and class bias in saying, 'You can just drive to work,'" said Basav Sen, climate justice project director at the Institute for Policy Studies.

Thank you for your interest in our work.

-- The National Equity Atlas team at PolicyLink and the USC Program for Environmental and Regional Equity (PERE)

National Equity Atlas Update

Dear Atlas Users,

Happy Holidays from the National Equity Atlas team! We are proud of the work we did in 2019 to advance the conversation on equitable growth and equip community leaders with data to power campaigns for racial and economic equity. Here are a few highlights:
 

We launched the Bay Area Equity Atlas!
On June 5th, we released our first local data and policy tool: the Bay Area Equity Atlas. Created in partnership with the San Francisco Foundation, the Atlas includes 21 metrics across the foundation’s People, Place, and Power equity framework and covers 271 geographies in the nine-county region. We’ve been thrilled to see communities using the data to protect renters from displacementimprove outcomes for the Latinx population, and develop equity strategies in the suburbs/exurbs, as well as to read the in-depth stories written by local journalists incorporating our data.

Leveraging Data for Local Policy and Systems Change
The dozens of equity profiles we have produced with local partners over the years continue to inform decision-making, organizing, and policy campaigns. Data from the Cincinnati Equitable Growth Profile helped advocates successfully pass a wage equity policy this March, and that same month our Omaha partners received an American Planning Association award for their work using the profile data to drive equitable planning for health, housing, and transportation. In 2019, we worked with community partners in Long Beach (CA), Orange County (CA), and Pinellas County (FL) to develop equity profiles that are now informing local policy discussions.

New Data Driving the Policy Debate on Inclusive Growth
This year, we added data to the Atlas tracking racial equity in entrepreneurship and business growth. We also produced an analysis that classifies regions according to how their economies are shifting with the rise of tech-driven industries, and what strategies can foster shared prosperity, including case studies of Charlotte, Philadelphia, and Stockton. And, we produced fact sheets to inform the New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty’s campaigns to protect families from predatory financial services.

Atlas in the News
Our data and reports have been covered by various local and national media outlets and articles, and journalists, as well as community leaders, have used our data in op-eds and articles. See this media coverage here.

Thank you for your interest! We are working hard to bring you updated data and a brand new interface in early 2020, and we are excited to reconnect in 2020.

The National Equity Atlas team at PolicyLink and the USC Program for Environmental and Regional Equity (PERE)

National Equity Atlas in 2019: Going Local, Informing Policy, Refreshing Data for the New Year!

Dear Atlas Users,

Happy Holidays from the National Equity Atlas team! We are proud of the work we did in 2019 to advance the conversation on equitable growth and equip community leaders with data to power campaigns for racial and economic equity. Here are a few highlights:
 

We launched the Bay Area Equity Atlas!
On June 5th, we released our first local data and policy tool: the Bay Area Equity Atlas. Created in partnership with the San Francisco Foundation, the Atlas includes 21 metrics across the foundation’s People, Place, and Power equity framework and covers 271 geographies in the nine-county region. We’ve been thrilled to see communities using the data to protect renters from displacement, improve outcomes for the Latinx population, and develop equity strategies in the suburbs/exurbs, as well as to read the in-depth stories written by local journalists incorporating our data.

Leveraging Data for Local Policy and Systems Change
The dozens of equity profiles we have produced with local partners over the years continue to inform decision-making, organizing, and policy campaigns. Data from the Cincinnati Equitable Growth Profile helped advocates successfully pass a wage equity policy this March, and that same month our Omaha partners received an American Planning Association award for their work using the profile data to drive equitable planning for health, housing, and transportation. In 2019, we worked with community partners in Long Beach (CA), Orange County (CA), and Pinellas County (FL) to develop equity profiles that are now informing local policy discussions.

New Data Driving the Policy Debate on Inclusive Growth
This year, we added data to the Atlas tracking racial equity in entrepreneurship and business growth. We also produced an analysis that classifies regions according to how their economies are shifting with the rise of tech-driven industries, and what strategies can foster shared prosperity, including case studies of Charlotte, Philadelphia, and Stockton. And, we produced fact sheets to inform the New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty’s campaigns to protect families from predatory financial services.

Atlas in the News
Our data and reports have been covered by various local and national media outlets and articles, and journalists, as well as community leaders, have used our data in op-eds and articles. See this media coverage here.

Thank you for your interest! We are working hard to bring you updated data and a brand new interface in early 2020, and we are excited to reconnect in 2020.

The National Equity Atlas team at PolicyLink and the USC Program for Environmental and Regional Equity (PERE)

National Equity Atlas Update

When you sign up for our email list (below right), you will receive updates about new Atlas content, events, and examples of equity data in action. 
 
Dear Bay Area Equity Atlas Users:
 
Happy July and welcome to our first monthly update! It has been a terrific first month for the Atlas. Since our June 4th launch, more than 3,000 people have visited the site and we are beginning to hear stories about how people are using Atlas data to inform their work to advance equity. Here is a roundup of our forthcoming events and latest activities.
 
Upcoming Webinar: Using Bay Area Equity Atlas Data to Prevent Displacement and Protect Renters
Data on how the housing crisis is affecting renters is a key ingredient in winning the strong tenant protections needed to stabilize renters and halt displacement. On July 23rd, from 3:00 - 4:00 p.m. PST, join the Atlas team and tenant advocates working in Concord, Hayward, Oakland, and San José to learn about how these local leaders are using Atlas data in their organizing and policy campaigns and what renter data you can find on the Atlas. Register here.
 
New Analysis: Bay Area Diversity Not Reflected Among Top Elected Leaders
The Bay Area is one of the most diverse regions in the country, but our analysis of the unique diversity of electeds dataset in the Atlas reveals that Whites (especially men) were overrepresented among elected officials while Latinx and Asian or Pacific Islanders were underrepresented. As of May 2018, 74 percent of top elected officials were White, while 40 percent of the population is White, and only 19 percent of electeds were Latinx or API, although those two groups represent half of the population. Read more.

Data Storytelling: New Partnership with Bay City News 
Helping journalists incorporate a strong equity analysis into their reporting through the use of disaggregated data is one of the Atlas team’s goals, so we are thrilled about our new partnership with Bay City News Service and sister LocalNewsMatters.org website to produce a series of 10 stories drawing on Atlas data. Check out the first two stories: Equity Ripples: Concord Feels the Weight of Bay Area Housing Crisis and Communities of Color Shifting to Suburbs, and follow #BayAreaEquityAtlas for upcoming stories.

Spreading the Equity Data
Our team was happy to conduct a training for the Northern California Grantmakers’ Racial Equity Action Institute cohort of leaders in business, government, nonprofits, and philanthropy. We also presented to the Power of 9 Committee and the Contra Costa Budget Justice Coalition workshop in Antioch. Interested in hosting a presentation or training? Drop us a line at info@bayareaequityatlas.org.
 
Atlas In the News
The launch of the Bay Area Equity Atlas was covered by SFGate, CBS San Francisco, Napa Valley Register and SF Bay. It’s mission, background, and features were also highlighted by Philanthropy News Digest.
 
Thank you!
 
The Bay Equity Atlas team

National Equity Atlas Update

Dear Atlas Users,

We are thrilled to announce the launch of the Bay Area Equity Atlas today! This new local data and policy tool includes several new and upgraded features we will be transferring to the National Equity Atlas later this year. Join tomorrow’s webinar to take a tour of the Atlas and see a preview of what is to come. We are also excited to share new data on entrepreneurship with you on our webinar June 27th.

Introducing the Bay Area Equity Atlas
Produced in partnership with the San Francisco Foundation, the Bay Area Equity Atlas brings the power of the National Equity Atlas down to the local level. This new community data resource provides 21 equity metrics disaggregated by race, gender, and income and tracking change over time for 272 geographies across the Bay Area region, including 220 cities and Census Designated Places. Fourteen are new indicators that are not included in the Atlas, including voting, diversity of electeds, and police use of force. Read the team’s welcome blog post about how this tool helps to democratize power, then learn about five essential features that makes the Bay Area Equity Atlas a next-generation community data tool. There’s also still time to sign up for tomorrow’s webinar.

Join Us for the Launch of Entrepreneurship Indicators
Businesses owned by people of color make up a significant and growing share of companies in cities across the country, yet the racial wealth gap and lack of access to capital stifle entrepreneurs of color and communities lose out on the jobs, services, and financial security that come with business development and growth. To equip communities with data on entrepreneurship, we are adding four indicators of business growth and diversity to the Atlas based on the Census Bureau’s 2007 and 2012 Survey of Business Owners. Join us on this webinar to learn about these indicators and hear from Gary Cunningham, president-elect of Prosperity Now, about strategies that support work to foster equitable entrepreneurship.

In the News
In early May, Tampa Bay Newspapers highlighted the findings from An Equity Profile of Pinellas County. Later in the month, Streetsblog USA covered a Salud America! report that used Atlas data to detail transportation equity challenges in Latinx communities. This nola.com article also focuses on transportation equity, but uses Atlas data about housing burden to make the case for housing and infrastructure investments to ease the burden.

On the Road
The Atlas team had a busy month presenting our data and insights at the Rise Together Opportunity Summit in San Jose; the GEO Conference in Seattle; the Madison Region Economic Development & Diversity Summit in Madison, Wisconsin; and the National Academies’ Committee Informing the Development of Healthy People 2030.


Thank you for your interest in our work.

The National Equity Atlas team at PolicyLink and the USC Program for Environmental and Regional Equity (PERE)

National Equity Atlas Update

Dear Atlas Users,

Happy Spring! Our team is excited to see our data informing comprehensive equity strategies in Pinellas County, FL and water equity efforts in Buffalo, NY. And we are hard at work getting ready to launch the Bay Area Equity Atlas!
 
Pinella County Equity Profile Release
This month, in partnership with UNITE Pinellas, our team released a new equity profile and summary of Pinellas County, FL. The release event drew over 400 people, ranging from high school students to community and organizational leaders eager to understand the data and take action. Anand Subramanian of PolicyLink presented the keynote and moderated a panel with representatives from the City of St. Petersburg, Pinellas County Commission, A New Deal for St. Pete, and the St. Petersburg Police Department. The report serves as a launching point for UNITE Pinellas and the members of its collaborative to orient their policy, systems, and narrative change strategies moving forward. The release event was covered in the St. Pete Catalyst and the Tampa Bay Times.
 
Buffalo’s Equitable Water Future
Earlier this month, the US Water Alliance and Buffalo’s Water Equity Task Force released “An Equitable Water Future: Buffalo,” a first-ever report on the connections between water management and equity in the city. The report uses Atlas data to make the connection between disparities in wealth and housing, and how those factors affect water systems. It argues that making water systems more equitable means ensuring that all people have access to safe, affordable water, and benefit from high-quality infrastructure and public amenities like waterfront parks.
 
Thank you for your interest in our work!

The National Equity Atlas team at PolicyLink and the USC Program for Environmental and Regional Equity (PERE)

National Equity Atlas Update

Dear Atlas Users,

Greetings from the National Equity Atlas team! This month, we released a new equity profile for Orange County, California. And we were thrilled to see our data on wage disparities used to power policy advocacy in Cincinnati!
 
Orange County Equity Report Release
On March 26, about 300 people gathered at the Bowers Museum in Santa Ana for the release event for An Equity Profile of Orange County, completed in partnership with Orange County Grantmakers. The presentation of data revealing stark inequities within the wealthy county made many participants uncomfortable — and ready to take action. Reacting to the presentation of the data by Dr. Manuel Pastor, Rosie Perez of Mission Integration at Providence St. Joseph Hospital said “I am motivated by the findings. I think it can bring all of us together to work toward equity.”

Cincinnati Leverages Equity Data to Win New Wage Equity Policy
On March 13, Cincinnati City Council barred employers from asking applicants about their salary history in an attempt to reduce wage disparities between men and women in the region. This was the direct result of advocacy by the Greater Cincinnati Foundation’s Women’s Fund, using data from our equity profile along with coalition building support from the PolicyLink All-In Cities initiative. The Cincinnati Business Courier and CityBeat covered the passing of the new ordinance.

Omaha Equitable Growth Profile Wins Planning Award
Our partners at the Metropolitan Area Planning Agency and the Heartland 2050 initiative received an award from the Nebraska chapter of the American Planning Association for their work using the Equitable Growth Profile of the Omaha-Council Bluffs Region to drive equity planning in the region. Since the profile was released in July, local leaders have used the data to inform multiple planning efforts spanning health, housing, transportation, and leadership development, including the United Way of the Midland’s Community Food Plan, the Douglas County Community Health Improvement Plan, and the City of Omaha’s Transit Oriented Development Initiative.

Join Our Team: PolicyLink is Hiring a Director for Our Equity Data Team
Love the Atlas? Come work with us! PolicyLink is seeking a director to lead our growing portfolio of work that leverages data to advance racial and economic equity. The director will have principal responsibility for the day-to-day management of the National Equity Atlas and the forthcoming Bay Area Equity Atlas and lead the development of other high-impact quantitative and mixed-methods analyses and data tools. Find the job description and instructions on how to apply here.

In the News
The Los Angeles Times used Atlas data on the housing burdens faced by minimum wage workers in Oakland in an article about the Athletics baseball team building housing units alongside their new stadium.

Thank you for your interest in our work!

The National Equity Atlas team at PolicyLink and the USC Program for Environmental and Regional Equity (PERE)

National Equity Atlas Update

Dear Atlas Users,

Greetings from the National Equity Atlas team! This month, we released a new equity profile for the city of Long Beach. We are also happy to see our research on Sacramento and Long Island being used to advance equitable growth policies in those communities.
 
Long Beach Equity Report Release
On February 5, the National Equity Atlas team, in partnership with Citi Community Development, the Long Beach Office of Equity, and Councilmember Rex Richardson’s Office, released an Equitable Growth Profile of the City of Long Beach at Long Beach City College Pacific Coast Campus. One hundred participants attended the event, including residents, nonprofit and philanthropic leaders, city officials, and staff. Dr. Manuel Pastor gave the keynote address, highlighting the benefits of racial economic inclusion and the importance of using data not only disaggregated by race/ethnicity, but also by immigrant status and ancestry to advance equity and shift policy. “These aren’t crazy things,” said Brian Addison in an article about the report’s policy recommendations in the Long Beach Post. “They’re doable. They’re respectable. And if we want to keep Long Beach, well, Long Beach, we have to actually start implementing them.”
 
Join Our Team: PolicyLink is Hiring a Director for Our Equity Data Team
Love the Atlas? Come work with us! PolicyLink is seeking a director to lead our growing portfolio of work that leverages data to advance racial and economic equity. The director will have principal responsibility for the day-to-day management of the National Equity Atlas and the forthcoming Bay Area Equity Atlas and lead the development of other high-impact quantitative and mixed-methods analyses and data tools. Find the job description and instructions on how to apply here.

California Data Sources
The Atlas was included in a crowdsourced compilation of data sources advocates turn to when they need publicly available data about California. Originally created for the communities participating in the California Accountable Communities for Health Initiative, Hillcrest Advisory currently maintains the regularly updated catalog.
 
In the News
Atlas data was used in the first of six longform reports by Hawaii Business magazine about families struggling to get by in the state. Sacramento News & Review provided coverage on a white paper released by the Sacramento Housing Alliance that included Atlas data on local rent increases. Our fact sheet on rent burdens in Chicago was cited in an In These Times cover article on grassroots organizing in the city. Nassau County Comptroller Jack Schnirman released a report on Black economic equity in the Long Island, NY county, which references a National Equity Atlas report from 2017. Newsday and The Island Now wrote about the report and its release event.
 
Thank you for your interest in our work!

The National Equity Atlas team at PolicyLink and the USC Program for Environmental and Regional Equity (PERE)

A Developmental Pathway for Achieving Promise Neighborhoods Results

Overview

This important tool was developed to help Promise Neighborhood communities and the field at large better understand the external conditions and developmental milestones that are needed to build the cradle to career continuum and to achieve the goals/outcomes set forth in Promise Neighborhoods. The tool illustrates the developmental pathways necessary to achieve the Promise Neighborhoods vision.

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